Spanish pdfs: Busco... / ¿Dónde está(n)...? (Places in town)

8 pdf files based on 15 bits of vocab for asking for directions in Spanish:

1. I'm looking for............................................................... busco
2. you're looking for.......................................................... buscas
3. he / she's looking for.................................................... busca
4. we're looking for........................................................... buscamos
5. they're looking for......................................................... buscan
6. I'm not looking for......................................................... no busco
7. what are you looking for?............................................. ¿qué buscas?
8. Where is (it)?................................................................ ¿Dónde está?
9. Where are (they)?.........................................................¿Dónde están?
10. Where is the church?................................................... ¿Dónde está la iglesia?
11. Where are the shops?.................................................. ¿Dónde están las tiendas?
12. around here.................................................................. por aquí
13. Is there a supermarket around here?........................... ¿Hay un supermercado por aquí?
14. I'm looking for the supermarket.................................... Busco el supermercado.
15. I'm looking for a café.................................................... Busco una cafetería.

Vocabulary tests

I've been thinking about vocabulary test formats and have come up with several, depending on the ability levels of the students. Examples in this post are based on the French vocab for car journeys / breakdowns (apart from the 2nd multi-choice example, clearly...): 

1. English to TL: tests production. They have to think of the word for themselves, and know how to spell it, plus possibly gender etc. Most challenging option. Made less challenging if you provide a word shape (e.g. spaces per letter) and even less so if you provide an anagram (e.g. dog = enhic).
Here's an example with word shapes provided:

Exploiting texts to maximum effect (UPDATED)

1. Type or paste in a text into the Mix and Gap editor screen

You can type or paste in any text of up to 500 words.

There are various sources of texts:
- The internet; news feeds; short articles etc.
- Your text book: this allows you to create resources based specifically on the book that your students are using in class.
- Past exam papers.
- Letters, songs, poems, etc.
- Your imagination :o)
- Students can type or paste in their own corrected written work, which can then be use to help them to learn their text, or shared with other students for extended text manipulation practice.

Ton Christ est juif (French resources based on a short poem)

I was reminded of this poem today when I followed a link from @MarieFrance on Twitter to this post on her blog:
http://mmeperkins.typepad.com/my_weblog/2012/01/po%C3%ABme-sur-les-nationalit%C3%A9s.html (which also has a link to a previous lesson / blog post with great ideas for teaching nationality, possessive adjectives and adjectival agreement, as well as a bit of citizenship...)

Anyway, as well as the poem and the link to the previous resources, there was also a link to a TaskMagic2 Text Match file. This really brought home to me a major improvement in TaskMagic3 compared with previous versions: in earlier versions of TaskMagic, any text that you put into Mix&Gap would be converted into one block of text, so it wasn't really possible to make exercises based on formatted text such as letters, recipes, songs, poems etc. TaskMagic3 makes it possible to create all sorts of interactive and printed resources based on these kinds of texts, as you'll see from the resources posted here.